Screwed post removal

In this video I want to show you how to remove a screwed post using ultrasonics. These posts has been used for a lot of years to give support to the restoration after a root canal treatment. Nowadays fiber posts which can be bonded instead of screwed, are commonly used instead of these old fashion solutions. Removing the post it’s a matter of patience, you have to break the cement around the post to make it loose. This kind of complications are just my #EverydayENDO cases. Watch the video in 720p50 HD.

Dr. Pablo Salmeron at Dr. Roze & Associates.

File retrieval

In this case, the doctor referring the patient asked me if I could retrieve the broken file.

Broken file in mesial root

File retrieval is always changeling for me because usually requires a lot of time and the collaboration of the patient trying not to move due to the high magnified field of view where I work on and a lot of patience as well; the use of the proper equipment plays a very important role.

This case has been done with ProUltra ultrasonic tips (Dentsply) under the Labomed Magna surgical microscope view.

These tips are made of titanium and can be pre-curved allowing to work in the direction you want. The bad side of these instruments is that they tend to get blunt and break very easily.

The use of the macriscope is a must, you need to see where are you activating the ultrasonic tip to preserve as much dentin as possible and to avoid perforations.

Broken file removed from mesial root

The broken file it behaves as a rigid body due its short length although the alloy what is made of should let it behave as a flexible metal. As I told before, be patient and remove dentin little by little to create more space is the only way to get the file out of the canal.

My advice for this kind of situations is try to bypass the broken file first, and if you can’t, try to retrieve it. Bypassing instruments is something that I’m not able to do 90% of the time.

Wise to resolve, and patient to perform.

Dr. Pablo Salmeron at Dr. Roze & Associates.

 

How to bypass a ledge

As you can see on the video, please watch it on 720p50 HD, the case I want to show today is a re-treatment of a lower left six first molar #36. The tooth presented a ledge and missed canal on the mesial root and another ledge and a broken instrument on the distal.

Before and after

Although ledges sometimes can look easy to bypass, is not always possible to do mainly because of the location of the ledge and the patient’s opening mouth range.

Our instruments are flexible but tend to work in a straight line because their memory effect. To bypass and fix this kind of problems, we need to approach the canal in the proper angulation and as I said, sometimes is really tricky because of the limited opening range of the patient. We need to pre-bend our instrument with the proper angulation and remove dentin, as less as possible, from inside of the canal with small ultrasonic tips in order to straighten the access. A CBCT will allows us to visualize the anatomy of the root and identify the real angulation of the canal which is something we have to keep in mind when we try to bypass the ledge.

Patient, knowledge of the anatomy and the use of high magnification as the surgical microscope are the keys to success in this kind of treatments.

“Remove know from knowledge and you are standing on the ledge”.

Dr. Pablo Salmeron at Dr. Roze and Associates.

Pulp stone

In this case, I found a pulp stone inside of a mandibular second molar. Dental pulp tissue can form dentin or osteodentin in the reaction to the homeostasis induced either by surgical or chemical stimulation, and the activity of pulp cells regulates the calcification of pulp tissue.

Pulp stones are calcified bodies in the dental pulps of the teeth, which can be seen in the pulps of healthy, diseased, and even un-erupted teeth in the primary and permanent dentition. Dental pulp stones may be free, attached, or embedded in the coronal or radicular pulp. They are considerably more common in the pulp chamber than in the root canal and may occur in a single tooth or several teeth.

Although pulp stones have no clinical significance, they lead to complications when endodontic therapy is needed.

As you can see in the video, their large size in pulp chamber may block access to canal orifices and alter the internal anatomy, and attached stones may deflect or engage the tip of exploring instruments, preventing their easy passage down the canal. In this kind of situation the use of the surgical microscope is mandatory.

This video has been done with a Labomed Magna microscope and Canon EOS camera.

“You can only treat what you can see”.

Dr. Pablo Salmeron at Dr. Roze and Associates.